How to translate the phrase: "Public access"?

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This topic contains 11 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  Yusupjan 3 months ago.

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  • #37007


    Arislan
    Participant

    If you are interested in the context of the phrase, here it is: “This document was removed from public access”.
    I can translate “public” which surely is adjective – “ammibapliq”, but I am having difficulties with the second word.

  • #37008


    Deniz
    Participant

    Selam !

    First of all, I’m sorry to tell you that I am not Uyghur and cannot give you the right answer for the moment : BUT ! As a futur translator, I can give you some tips in order to help you.

    I definately advise you TO NOT translate sentences & words like .. literally. Do you see what I mean ?
    Do not translate English into Uyghurche words for words ( we call it “Mirror translation” ).

    So, in fact, you just have to TRANSPOSE the sentence, and focus on the key word. Think about how you can explain this to a child. How can you explain “public access” to a little child ? Think about the image that we are giving to you.

    What does it really mean your sentence ? ” This document was removed from public access ” ?!
    It means that it was literally forbidden for the people to get to know about this document. It was kept secret from the public, they could not have the right to get information about it.

    In Turkish we do translate it as : ” Bu belge, kamu erişimden kaldırıldı “. Which means, the document was kept secret / HIDDEN from the public. ( PREVENT SOMETHING/SOMEBODY FROM ! )

    I hope it will help you for your continuation,

    Rexmet,

    Deniz.

  • #37010


    Deniz
    Participant

    Sorry I totally forgot to add that :

    When you do want to translate sentences, the most important is that you do NOT CHANGE THE RIGHT MEANING of the sentence & key word ; if you really have difficulties, just focus on how you can transpose it, make it easier to understand it for non English-speakers for instance,

    Best regards,

    Deniz.

  • #37014


    Arislan
    Participant

    Wa eleyküm essalam! Thanks for the tips on how to translate words! Érishim does it, in Uyghur language it is the word made from verb érishish – get(access to). I am not a linguist but my guts tell me according to sime rule you can make érishim from érishish, in the same way we have word kélishim – agreement made from kélishish – agree. Thanks a lot! You really helped me!

  • #37015


    Deniz
    Participant

    Erzimeydu, sizdin bek pehirlinimen.

    That is just perfect ; Keep going it,

    Deniz –

  • #37038


    admin
    Keymaster

    If possible, can you please share the Uyghur translation of the following sentence?
    This document was removed from public access.

    Thanks.

  • #37039


    Arislan
    Participant

    Sure! Although, the translation could be done in more than one way, especially that of the word “removed”. My translation is:

    Bu höjjet ammiwiy érishimdin élindi.

  • #37040


    admin
    Keymaster

    Thank you for sharing your time, your knowledge here in this forum. The “érishim” is dead on for “access”.
    If we can put it the translation following way, it is more natural, what do you think?

    Bu höjjet ammiwiy érishimdin éliwitildi.

    I think we should use passive voice for Uyghur translation the same way as English one in this case. Otherwise, it sounds opposite.

  • #37041


    Arislan
    Participant

    Yeap! Your translation sound OK to me. I agree with you, though

    höjjet élindi

    is still given in passive voice isn’t it?

  • #37061


    admin
    Keymaster

    You are right. “höjjet élindi” is passive. Sorry for that.

  • #37069


    Arislan
    Participant

    No need to apologize, we are all human and we tend to make mistakes. Errare humanum est.

  • #37099


    Yusupjan
    Participant

    بۇ ماتىرىيال ئاممىنىڭ ئىشلىتىلىشىدىن توختىتىلدى.
    This is how I understood the sentence in Uyghur.

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